Here’s How Naughty Dog Created Realistic Characters & Authentic Emotions In The Last Of Us Part II

The Last of Us Part II is one of the highly anticipated games for the year for a reason. There’s so much history with the success from the original Last of Us that fans have been yearning for more. Now, as we approach the release of the game on June 19, PlayStation have started a brand new series of videos which break down key aspects of the game.

Each video will feature interviews with members of the team and will discuss design, technology, and ideas that shaped the development of the game over the past six years.

In their latest episode, Inside the Details, Neil Druckman, Naughty Dog Vice President and director of the game talked about some features that added to the realism of the characters in the game. One of the things that adds to the authenticity is their ability to now show veins popping in character model’s foreheads if they’re really angry, or likewise they can redden the skin based on emotion or even physical reactions.

Druckman goes on to add that they’re now even capable of controlling how character model’s eyes get wet. How tears flow down the face of characters is all new tech created specifically for this game. They dive even deeper with what the game will be capable of, and so far it’s looking to be one of the most stellar gaming experiences for the year. The level of detail they’ve already showcased before release truly makes me hopeful for a heart-wrenching, beautifully designed game.

If you were keen on knowing even more of The Last of Us Part II, they have two other episodes available. You can check them out below!

These episodes are spoiler free, so if you were worried about ruining your experience with the game, don’t be. The next episode is titled Inside the World which is set to release on June 3, which I assume is where they will explore more about the details about the world they’ve created. Should make for an interesting time.

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